Sump Filters – Types of Planted Aquarium Filters

by Apr 24, 20215 comments

Now that you know the different and critical types of filtration in a planted aquarium, how it relates to Mother Nature’s natural water filtration systems, and how aquatic plants aid in the water’s filtration in our aquariums, it is now time to discuss the Sump Filters, one of the types of planted aquarium filters.

Planted aquarium filtration is the lifeline of all the inhabitants in the tank. Aquarium filters remove physical, dissolved chemical wastes and other contaminants from the tank. Without it, you would have to change the water more frequently, and this hobby becomes a chore (you will not be able to enjoy your planted aquarium that way). It simplifies our maintenance and widens the days between water changes.

Furthermore, it affects the health and well-being not only of your faunas but also your plants. Aquarium filters are critical to support life in your tank. As I said before, our planted aquariums are a relatively small and enclosed ecosystem compared to our faunas’ natural environment. We have no running water here, and at the very least, we should replicate their natural environment by using an appropriately sized filter.

Table of Contents

Functions of a Planted Aquarium Filter
Types of Planted Aquarium Filters
Sump Filters
How does a Sump filter work?
How do I maintain a Sump filter?
What should I be aware of when using a Sump filter?
Pros and Cons
Below the Tank
Pros
Cons
Overhead
Pros
Cons
Stressing This Out Again!
Conclusion
Closing Remarks
HOB Filter Close Up Aquascaped by Omar Krishnan Afuang Philippines

Hang on Back/HOB/Power Filters

They are also called hang-on-back filters (HOB), and are designed to hang on the back of your aquarium, eing! Power filters are the most commonly used planted aquarium filter because they provide good to excellent mechanical and biological filtration simultaneously. They can also provide the needed water surface agitation for aerating your water.

Using a Sponge Filter Aquascaped by Andrian Jutba Philippines

Internal Filters

An internal filter is placed inside the tank and is totally submerged in water from the name itself. They were the first aquarium filters available for home aquariums. But with the dawn of aquascaping, these filters have lost their acclaim, but they still have their uses in planted aquariums.

Canister Filters by Billie Jay Basilio Philippines

Canister Filters

Canister filters are more powerful and larger than most other filters, and they are suitable for medium to large planted aquariums. This means you can stuff more media due to its larger capacity/volume, which in turn allows for better filtration and more beneficial bacteria colonization. The simple fact is the more volume your filter has, and the more media you can stuff into it, the more effective and efficient your filtration is and the clearer/cleaner your water is.

Using a Trickle Filter Aquascaped by Jei Joaquin Philippines

Trickle Filters

The trickle filter concept is to expose the water to as much air as possible, providing more dissolved oxygen. This will make your biological filtration very efficient and far better than other filters. If you can remember, your biological filtration’s efficiency in converting harmful substances (Ammonia and Nitrites) in your water into a less harmful form (Nitrate) depends on the amount of their food and oxygen in the water.

Using Sump Filters Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Sump Filters - You Are Here

Think about a trickle filter as vertical filtration stages and a sump filter as a horizontal one by utilizing chambers separated by baffles to route the water horizontally. The main takeaway here is that the filter media are always wet/submerged in water as opposed to a trickle filter. A sump filter can be positioned below your main tank, overhead, or integrated.

A Sump with a Fluidized Bed Filter Designed by Nigel Sia Philippines

Fluidized Bed Filters

In its most common implementation, a Fluidized Bed filter is actually a 3 chambered sump separated by baffles. The big difference is that the biological media is held in suspension by a pumped water flow or bubbles from an air pump so that every particle of the media will have a large part of its surface area exposed to water flow and well aerated at any given time to home the beneficial bacteria that will filter the water off of Ammonia and Nitrites, as opposed to static media sump filters.

The function of an aquarium filter for our planted aquarium is not limited only to provide filtration.

  • A suitably sized aquarium filter can provide the needed water flow or turbulence to distribute the nutrients and CO2 (if you are injecting CO2, prolonging the CO2 bubbles contact with water so it can be dissolved before it reaches the surface).
  • Not just distributing nutrients and CO2, it provides the water current that some fish loves to swim against. Plants swaying with the gentle water current is a sight to behold.
  • A breeding ground for beneficial bacteria to break down harmful Nitrogenous compounds (Ammonia, Nitrites) into less harmful ones (Nitrate).
  • An aquarium filter can also provide the water surface agitation, aerating the water for our faunas and beneficial bacteria’s nitrification activities.
  • It can also prevent the accumulation of wastes, sludge, mulm in the substrate, keeping them suspended/floating so they can be taken in by the filter’s intake.
A Body of Water in a Tropical Forest

There are numerous things to consider when buying your planted aquarium filter by providing each filter’s pros and cons. Still, before we get to that and find you the right one (you can even DIY your own filter), you need to familiarize yourself with the different types of filters available in the market. Also, we are on a planted aquarium website. Obviously, we will discuss those popular filters applicable to a planted aquarium. 

So Undergravel filters, you are out! Nobody wants to rescape their planted aquariums every 2 to 3 months to clean the detritus that’s been pinned down by this filter. With the advent of aquascaping, that’s the nail in its coffin.

Types of Planted Aquarium Filters

Sump Filters

The defining features of a trickle filter are its tower and the water trickling down (vertical) the several stages of filtration, oxygenating the water well, which results in an excellent biological filtration. What if we remove that tower? That leaves us with only the sump. We defined the sump in conjunction with a trickle filter as just a holding area for the filtered water before it gets returned into your main tank. A sump can be a normal tank or water container below your main tank. But how can we make a sump to provide filtration?

Think about a trickle filter as vertical filtration stages and a sump filter as a horizontal one by utilizing chambers separated by baffles to route the water horizontally. The main takeaway here is that the filter media are always wet/submerged in water as opposed to a trickle filter.

A sump filter can be positioned below your main tank, overhead, or integrated.

Using an Overhead Sump Aquascaped by Jeano Gabriel Sunico Philippines

Using an Overhead Sump Aquascaped by Jeano Gabriel Sunico Philippines

Using an Integrated Sump Filter Aquascaped by Hernani Permalino Philippines

Using an Integrated Sump Filter Aquascaped by Hernani Permalino Philippines

How does a Sump filter work?

For a sump filter under your main tank, like a trickle filter, a sump filter starts with some overflow system letting the water overspill from your main tank and then will drain into your sump filter (no drip plate here) with the help of gravity. If you don’t want to drill holes into your main tank or don’t want to modify it, you can use a commercially available overflow box that is self-siphoning or you can DIY your own one. Or you can use two submersible water pumps: one from the main tank to pump water out and two, from the last chamber of the sump to pump filtered water back into your main tank. The pump that will push filtered water back into your main tank should be more powerful as it needs to overcome gravity.

Here is a great video example of DIYing your own overflow system by Joey Mullen also known as the King of DIY, on Youtube. There are also sump filters that are integrated into the main tank, complete with the overflow system. You can even DIY your own design and can have limitless room for customizations (if you are handy). Provided below are two of the most common implementations of a sump filter, bottom and overhead. Take note of the design of the baffles resulting to the media always submerged in water.

DIY Integrated Sump Filter by John Joshua Wang JJ Philippines

DIY Integrated Sump Filter by John Joshua Wang JJ Philippines

Using an DIY Integrated Sump Filter Designed and Aquascaped by John Joshua Wang JJ Philippines

Same Tank as on the Left – Designed and Aquascaped by John Joshua Wang JJ Philippines

Bottom Sump Filter and Water Flow Diagram

Bottom Sump Filter and Water Flow Diagram

Overhead Sump Filter and Water Flow Diagram

Overhead Sump Filter and Water Flow Diagram

As I said above, the filter media are always wet/submerged in water instead of a trickle filter, and the water is routed horizontally. This is done by chambers separated by baffles to route the water. The first chamber is usually where you will put all your mechanical media. The second and the rest of the chambers, depending on how many, will be home to your biological media. The last chamber will be the holding area (much like the sump in a trickle filter), which holds the filtered water before it gets pumped back into your main tank.

Customized Overhead Sump Filter Designed by Bhoie Baguito Philippines

Customized Overhead Sump Filter Designed by Bhoie Baguito Philippines

Customized Sump Filter by Jhayar Gonzales Philippines

Customized Sump Filters by Jhayar Gonzales Philippines

Empty Sump Filter Below the Main Tank by Jancy Delos Reyes Philippines

Empty Sump Filter Below the Main Tank by Jancy Delos Reyes Philippines

But what about a sump filter above your tank? An overflow system will not work since we are fighting now the force of gravity. In this case, we can use a submersible pump inside the tank to pump out the water upwards and into your sump filter. The water pump’s power should be able to overcome the force of gravity, so make sure the height of your sump filter with respect to your submersible pump’s height is not too high.

Overhead Sump Filter Designed by Ian Rocha Philippines

Overhead Sump Filter Designed by Ian Rocha Philippines

For sump filters situated over your tank, you can just let the filtered water drain down into your main tank with the help of gravity, or you can channel the filtered water into a spray bay. The raining/draining water will further oxygenate the water. Sump filters positioned over your tank are designed that in the case of a power outage, the water will not drain completely due to the baffles’ design, keeping your filter media wet until the power comes back on. Here is a great video example of designing your Overhead Sump filter by Joey Mullen, also known as the King of DIY, on Youtube.

DIY Overhead Sump Aquascaped by KP Pasia Philippines

DIY Overhead Sump Aquascaped by KP Pasia Philippines

How do I maintain a Sump filter?

Depending on your filter’s design and how you integrate easy access to an effective mechanical filtration, you will not be required to maintain your sump filter for a very long time and reducing the need for water changes. This means you only have to clean or replace your mechanical media and lets you leave your biological media alone for a long, long time.

To add to that, do not maintain/clean your filter/media with chlorinated tap water! Always see to it that you clean your filter media using old extracted water from a water change. Tap/chlorinated water can instantly kill the beneficial bacteria you have long-established. Your tank cycling reverts to zero. You will have the agony to repeat it (Hello cloudy water/bacterial bloom!!!).

Bottom Sump Filter for a Biotope Tank Designed by Nigel Sia Philippines

Bottom Sump Filter for a Biotope Tank Designed by Nigel Sia Philippines

Custom Sump Filter Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Custom Bottom Sump Filter Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Customize Sump Filter Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Customize Bottom Sump Filter Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Squeeze and rinse whatever mechanical media you have with old tank water only from a water change to release all the detritus, muck, organic matters trapped by it. Keep your biological media wet by submerging them, also in collected old tank water. Do not use foams, sponges, brushes, even your fingers, or any abrasive products to scrub them (your biological media). Just rinse them with old tank water.

DIY Integrated Sump Filter by Braga Matteo Fernando Philippines

DIY Integrated Sump Filter by Braga Matteo Fernando Philippines

DIY Side Integration Sump and HOB Capabilities by Mark Mota Philippines

DIY Side Integration Sump and HOB Capabilities by Mark Mota Philippines

DIY Sump Using Alternative Materials - Storage Boxes

DIY Sump Using Alternative Materials – Storage Boxes

What should I be aware of when using a Sump filter?

They are suitable for large to huge aquariums (100 gallons and up) (most often utilized with monster fish planted or non-planted tanks). But there are smaller tanks that have integrated sump filters as well (10 to 50 gallons). You can even DIY your tank with an integral sump filter (but that will take away space). There are many DIY designs and tutorials that you can research and implement all over the internet that will teach you to set up your very own sump filter using inexpensive materials. But really, no one can stop you from using an external sump filter for small to medium planted tanks. I have hobbyist friends that do. Here is a great video example of designing your Sump filter by Joey Mullen, also known as the King of DIY, on Youtube

Also, with all the water surface area exposed into the air and all those water movements, and splashing, the sump filter provides excellent biological filtration due to a lot of aeration your water is being subjected to. Remember, nitrification activities depend on how much-dissolved oxygen is present in your tank and available food for your good bacteria. However, you will waste a lot of your CO2 if you are injecting causing you to raise your bubbles per second (bps) just to reach equilibrium and just to measure a 1 pH drop. 

Overhead Sump by Dann Morales Philippines

Custom Overhead Sump Philippines

Overhead Sump Filter by Jhayar Gonzales Philippines

Overhead Sump Filter by Jhayar Gonzales Philippines

Sump Filter by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Sump Filter by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

By using a sump filter, it effectively adds more gallons of water to your system. More water means a more stable system. Any Ammonia spikes will likely go unnoticed, and you don’t have to follow the “1 inch per gallon” rule when it comes to stocking faunas. They are usually 1/3 the size of your main tank, but I know hobbyist friends that designed their sump filters equal or even larger than their main tanks. You can not put a larger sump filter than your main tank in terms of volume at the top for obvious reasons.

Plus, you have a lot more room for your mechanical and biological media, but this means you have to spend more on media. Still, you can use cheap alternative media as a replacement to the commercial ones like lava rocks or pumice stones.

Overhead Sump or Trickle Filter. It depends on your Implementation

Overhead Sump or Trickle Filter? This type of overhead filter can act as a Trickle or Sump Filter. It depends on your implementation. If the water just trickles down into your media and your media is not submerged in water, then it acts as a Trickle Filter. If you find a way to slow down the draining of the water, and you keep your media submerged, then it acts as a sump filter.

Setting up a sump filter for a beginner hobbyist might be restrictive due to the higher startup cost (available commercial models or customized ones). Not to mention you have to design the system well (DIY). However, considering a DIY sump filter requires careful planning and design in the event of a power outage to prevent overflow in the case of a bottom sump (if you are using an overflow system).

You can also set up your very own Aquaponics system with this filter. Aquaponics is a fusion of aquaculture, in which you grow fish and other aquatic animals, then Hydroponics, which is growing plants without soil. Aquaponics combines this symbiotic relationship in which plants get their nutrients from the aquatic animals’ wastes while plants serve as a natural filtration for the water for the aquatic animals’ benefits.

Depending on the size of your main tank, sump filters take up a lot of space, even though you can keep them hidden under your aquarium cabinet. There is little to no room anymore for your other equipment. A sump filter above your tank may rob you of some room/space to maneuver while working with your planted tank or doing maintenance. Did I not say that it causes distractions on an otherwise pleasant scape?

Sump Filter and Aquaponics by Renz Marrion Gabayno Philippines

Sump Filter and Aquaponics by Renz Marrion Gabayno Philippines

To summarize, here are the pros and cons of a Sump filter:

Below the Tank

Pros

  • provides excellent mechanical and biological filtration – plus you have a lot of room for your media
  • very customizable when it comes to the filter media of your choosing
  • Depending on your filter’s design and how you integrate easy access to an effective mechanical filtration, you will not be required to maintain your sump filter for a very long time and reducing the need for water changes. This means you only have to clean or replace your mechanical media and lets you leave your biological media alone for a long, long time.
  • can be completely hidden from view – you can also hide some of your equipment such as your heater from your main tank
  • ideal for heavy loads – you can get away with overstocking without affecting your water parameters
  • adds more water volume to your system – more gallons of water make for a more stable enclosed ecosystem for your faunas and plants.
  • Completely customizable – you can design or buy customized ones according to your requirements.
  • Very flexible regarding main tank size – before, sump filters are only meant for huge tanks. But nowadays, they can also be very flexible with small to medium to large tanks.
  • It can be home to your very own Aquaponics system or a refugium. A refugium can allow you to home delicate fish/shrimp species or allow you to grow plants that can assist in nitrates reduction (you need another light though, but daylight LED bulbs will work), such as Pothos plants (Epipremnum Aureum).
Sump Filter Under the Main Tank Aquascaped by Yong Uayan Philippines

Sump Filter Under the Main Tank Aquascaped by Yong Uayan Philippines

Cons

  • requires considerable planning and design to prevent flooding as a result of a power outage (if DIY) – this means you have to consider the size of your sump filter that is situated below your main tank to accommodate the extra water that will drain from your main tank (when holes are drilled as an overflow)
  • can waste a lot of co2 (if you are injecting) due to the surface area of the water exposed to air and all that water movement, splashing, etc.
  • could be too overwhelming for a beginner in terms of cost (commercial models or customized ones plus the filter media and pumps) or when planning and designing (DIY)
  • takes up a lot of space even though you can keep it hidden under your aquarium cabinet
  • Unless you have an overflow box or DIY-ed your own overflow system, or using submersible pumps, you have to drill the tank, which may not be appealing to some. Also, it isn’t easy to sell your drilled tanks in the second-hand market.
Sump Filter Customized Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Sump Filter Customized Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Overhead

Pros

  • can provide excellent mechanical and biological filtration
  • very customizable when it comes to the filter media of your choosing
  • Depending on your filter’s design and how you integrate easy access to an effective mechanical filtration, you will not be required to maintain your sump filter for a very long time and reducing the need for water changes. This means you only have to clean or replace your mechanical media and lets you leave your biological media alone for a long, long time.
  • Can return highly oxygenated filtered water – the draining of filtered water from an overhead sump into your main tank will create water surface agitation, which will further oxygenate your water.
  • Ideal for heavy loads – you can get away with overstocking without affecting your water parameters
  • adds more water volume to your system – more gallons of water make for a more stable enclosed ecosystem for your faunas and plants.
  • no need to plan for a power outage to prevent flooding since there is no overflow system and the pump will stop as well – sump filters positioned over your tank are designed that, in the case of a power outage, the water will not drain completely due to the baffles design, keeping your filter media wet until the power comes back on.
  • can be home for your very own Aquaponics system – can grow common indoor plants that roots in water even with room lighting only
Using an Overhead Sump Filter Aquascaped by Gene Chee Philippines

Using an Overhead Sump Filter Aquascaped by Gene Chee Philippines

Using an Overhead Sump Filter Aquascaped by Neil Aldrin Tiongson Philippines

Using an Overhead Sump Filter Aquascaped by Neil Aldrin Tiongson Philippines

Cons

  • it causes distractions on an otherwise pleasant aquascape of the main tank
  • could be too overwhelming for a beginner in terms of cost (commercial models or customized plus the media and pump/s) or when planning and designing (DIY)
  • may rob you of some room/space to maneuver while working with your planted tank from the top or doing maintenance
  • You must put a pump inside the main tank (another eyesore and equipment in the tank) to pump water into the overhead sump filter. The pump’s power and height of the sump filter is another concern making sure that the pump of your choosing can overcome the force of gravity.
  • can waste a lot of co2 (if you are injecting) due to the surface area of the water exposed to air and all that water movement, splashing, etc.
  • Adds to the weight from the top of your main tank – limiting you only to use light-weight filter media – imagine the weight of a sump filter stuffed with filter media, full of water, adding more stress to your main tank’s structure.
Using Sump Filters Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Using Sump Filters Designed by Chrisrock Orongan Philippines

Using an Internal Sump Aquascaped by Hernani Permalino Philippines

Using an Internal Sump Aquascaped by Hernani Permalino Philippines

Stressing This Out Again!

Whichever filter you had chosen from the list above, do not maintain/clean your filter/media with chlorinated tap water! Always see to it that you clean your filter media using old extracted water from a water change or a water source known to have no chlorine. Tap/chlorinated water can instantly kill the beneficial bacteria you have long-established. Your tank cycling reverts to zero. You will have the agony to repeat it (Hello cloudy water/bacterial bloom!!!).

Squeeze and rinse whatever mechanical media you have with old tank water only from a water change to release all the detritus, muck, organic matters trapped by it. Keep your biological media wet by submerging them, also in collected old tank water. Do not use foams, sponges, brushes, even your fingers, or any abrasive products to scrub them (your biological media). Just rinse them with old tank water.

Conclusion

This article concluded the importance of a carefully chosen planted aquarium filter and how critical it is to support life in our tanks. It can distribute nutrients and CO2 across the whole tank and provides the water current that fish loves to swim against. It can also be a breeding ground for beneficial bacteria, provides the needed water surface agitation, oxygenating the water for our faunas, and nitrification activities.

Next are the Sump filters. A sump can provide filtration horizontally, opposite the Trickle filter, by employing chambers separated by baffles to route the water. It is designed that the media are always submerged in water instead of a Trickle filter in which the media is always exposed to air. A sump filter can be placed below your main tank, overhead, or integrated.

Maintenance, depending on your sump’s design and mechanical filtration effectiveness, will be very far apart. This means you only need to clean/change your mechanical media and don’t need to touch your biological media for a very long time. Before, they are more suitable for large to huge tanks, but nowadays, smaller tanks have integrated sump filters.

There are many DIY designs and tutorials that you can research and implement all over the internet that will teach you to set up your very own sump filter using inexpensive materials and media. A sump filter effectively adds more gallons of water to your main tank. More water means a more stable system. They are usually 1/3 the size of your main tank, but there are implementations where the sump filter is larger than the main system.

We also discussed the pros and cons of a sump filter for each: under and overhead. They might be too overwhelming to implement for beginner hobbyists, but the pros outweigh their cons (and some cons have alternatives or immediate workarounds).

Want to Explore More?

Walstad Tank Aquascaped by Martin Ladioray Philippines

The Walstad Method for Aquariums

Most of the hobbyists in planted aquariums often use a substantial amount of technology/equipment to provide good lighting, filtration, CO2 injection, and fertilizer dosing in their aquascaped tanks. Some hobbyists choose to grow plants using very minimum technology as possible as they can and succeed in growing healthy and lush plants.

My 3rd Re-scape

The Fastest Method – How to Cycle a Planted Aquarium

We already discussed the fastest way of cycling your newly planted aquarium. That is to use your old filter media, gravel, soil, hardscapes, and even part of the old water from your old aquarium to your newly planted aquarium.

Accumulated Wastes and Organic Debris

TDS – The Planted Aquarium Water Parameters

TDS is the measure of all dissolved organic and inorganic solid substances in your water. However, tests of this water parameter don’t say what comprises your TDS. It measures the total of all molecular, ionized, and any microscopic substances in our water that cannot be caught by your filtration.

Water Drop on Grass After a Rain

Safe Water Sources for Planted Aquariums

How does Osmosis relate to the quality of water we used? It turns out, faunas and plants don’t only need pure H2O molecules. They also need salts (carbonates), minerals (calcium, magnesium, iron), etc. Present in the water but also not too much.

Dutch Style Aquascaped by Lester Plata Philippines

Dutch Style Planted Aquariums

This style is characterized by many different assortments of plants and leaf types. Carefully planning and designing a multitude of textures, shapes, and plants’ colors is the main focus. It is much like the terrestrial plants that are displayed in flower gardens.

Closing Remarks

I hope you enjoyed this article. If you have additional questions or want to share your experiences with the Sump Filters you used, please leave a comment below.

Next, we will be discussing the Fluidized Bed Filters.

5 Comments

  1. Dereck

    Wow, what an article! I had no idea at the level of knowledge and detail that goes into setting up an aquarium. You really dive into the details and highlight how important it is to carefully choose the right filter for your aquarium. I also appreciate the photo examples you include, I’m more of a visual learner so those helped. I’m not much of a DIY person, but its really cool to see what some others are able to create as well.

    Thank you for putting this information together and sharing your knowledge!

    Reply
    • Lemuel Sacop

      Hello Dereck,

      Thank you for visiting my website and appreciating my article. I hope in some way or two, I was able to help you in your decision to keep a planted aquarium at your very own home.

      Reply
  2. Matthew/Deloris

    We have a 40-gallon tank that has two Oscars that require lots of filter changes and for a while, I been wanting to change to a sump filter. This is more beneficial for us because we are always on the go and these you can leave for a longer period of time. We travel for long periods of time we want to build our own we’ve got all the parts we have been debating. The only thing is that we want to help keep the good bacteria inside and what filters to use.
    The filter is a big part of keeping your tank safe and with sump filters this allows us to wait longer to clean the filters.
    Thanks for this article is relates to us and our situation with moving our regular pump to a sump filter lots of learning today.

    Reply
    • Lemuel Sacop

      Hello Matthew and Deloris,

      Thanks for visiting my website and sharing your experiences with your 40 gallons tank for your Oscars. Oscars can get big and I bet a carefully designed sump filter can keep up with all the waste they produce in your aquarium. May I know what is the current filter type that you are using? If you are planning to migrate to a sump filter, you can just transfer the existing media to your new sump. But keep in mind to always keep the media wet or submerge with old tank water in preparation for migrating to minimize die-offs of your good bacteria. Do not dry the media out.

      Reply
  3. Matt Lin

    Hi Lemuel,

    My dad used to have a tank at home, but he abandoned it after one year due to the hard work related to keeping the water clean for healthy fish & plants. I have to admit it’s quite relaxing to see fish swimming in a water tank, but the maintenance is just too much…

    It’s good to know that you share different types of filters we can use for the tank, and it’s comprehensive and educational. I believe people who are looking for the information can find what he needs from this article.

    Thanks for sharing today,
    Matt

    Reply

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